Tag Archives: Christian Manhood

Flesh Tamers: Christian Manliness: The Courage to Stand Firm

This weekend is the official launch of my first book, Christian Manliness: The Courage to Stand Firm.

The fear of speaking up and speaking out in truth is destroying the modern Christian church in the United States. Christian men have lost courage.

Christian men are not being courageous in the home, church, or communities. This must Stop! Our King deserves courage as He had courage in the face of opposition. The enemy and fleshly comfort is being allowed to have an unchecked lead role as head of our lives.

The fear of losing the praise of men, the fear of losing our jobs, the fear of fully believing the Truth of who Jesus is. This first battle is within us, as men, to overcome our own doubt and start living like we genuinely believe in Truth!

This book is a review on the subject of Christian manliness and the courage needed to stand on the truth of Christ in the face of opposition, being a good steward of the truth and our physical bodies, and to shun the praise of society and the fleeting pleasure and comfort of living for fleshly desires.

My goal in authoring this book is to show that modern Christianity is fighting for relevance today from a position of weakness, and as such will fail in the future to be the societal pillar that it once was unless it recaptures the courageous and manly spirit of the “author and perfector of our faith” (Heb 12:2), Jesus Christ, who was both manly and courageous, and is the matchless example of manhood.

My hope is that Christian Manliness: The Courage to Stand Firm is going to spur reflection and action and act as a reminder that we, as Christians, are on the side of Truth. We don’t dabble in far flung conspiracy, false teachings or hope in man, but we stand firm on the Truth of Jesus Christ.

We must be courageous in the face of opposition and be ready to accept the price of following Christ as we also must be willing to accept and repent of our own failures.

As this is my first book, I will gladly accept feedback. Please email me and let me know how I can improve, I’m sure there is much to learn. Favorable ratings on Amazon are very welcome as this helps me gain more readers and helps me in sharing this message. Thank you in advance.

Preview or purchase the book on Amazon at this link.

The Call to Christian Manliness (Truth)

Internal Conflict. A state of being with more meaning for a man of imperfect nature. Yet in battle with an external force of borrowed legitimacy.

And in this life-long fight, to be waged by every one of us single-handed against a host of foes, the last armament for a good fight, the last proof and test of our courage and manfulness, must be loyalty to truth.

This is the most rare and difficult of all human qualities.

For when the truth is spoken it has been wielded as a weapon of destruction. Tearing down kingdoms and strongholds built on false doctrine and desires of foolishness.

Loyalty to truth, perfected over a lifetime, asks increasingly more of us. It sets before us a standard of manliness always rising higher and higher. Though the nature of men is of decreasing courage in the face of opposition.

And this is the great lesson which we will learn from Christ’s life, the more earnestly and faithfully we study it.

“For this end was I born, and for this cause came I into the world, to bear witness to the truth.”

To bear this witness against declared and open enemies is comparatively easy; but, to bear it against those we love; against those whose judgment and opinions we respect, in defense or advancement of that which approves itself as true to our own inmost conscience, this is the last and abiding test of courage and of manliness.

Copyright 2020, Johnathan Sexton

Adapted from True Manliness, Thomas Hughes

Martin Luther King, Jr., a message for the church today

In April of 1963, Martin Luther King, Jr. wrote an open letter to several clergymen who had written him in jail. The clergymen were not favorable of his “nonviolent direct action” in Birmingham to affect change concerning segregation in the city.

In his letter, Martin Luther King, Jr. took aim at several groups, but the complacent Christian church was a big target.

Although these words were written to the church of the 1960s, the words ring true as much today as they did then. I am a big believer in the cycles that take place in human history. Why? Because I know so many people who are ignorant of true history and we are doomed to repeat it.

As you read the excerpt below. You fill in the blank on what social injustice your church is not fighting to correct. You fill in the blank on what your church has conformed to in the face of fear. There is no need for me to call out all the possible options for you. I believe you will feel the conviction placed on you as you read this excerpt from “Letter from a Birmingham Jail”. 

Yes, I see the church as the body of Christ. But, oh! How we have blemished and scarred that body through social neglect and fear of being nonconformists.

There was a time when the Church was very powerful. It was during that period when the early Christians rejoiced when they were deemed worthy to suffer for what they believed. In those days the church was not merely a thermometer that recorded the ideas and principles of popular opinion; it was a thermostat that transformed the mores of society. Wherever the early Christians entered a town the power structure got disturbed and immediately sought to convict them for being “disturbers of the peace” and “outside agitators.” But they went on with the conviction that they were a “colony of heaven”, and had to obey God rather than man. They were small in number but big in commitment. They were too God-intoxicated to be “astronomically intimidated.” They brought an end to such ancient evils as infanticide and gladiatorial contest.


Things are different now. The contemporary church is so often a weak, ineffectual voice with an uncertain sound. It is so often the arch supporter: of the status quo. Far from being disturbed by the presence of the church, the power structure of the average community is consoled by the Church’s silent and often vocal sanction of things as they are. But the judgment of God is upon the church as never before. If the church of today does not recapture the sacrificial spirit of the early church, it will lose its authentic ring, forfeit the loyalty of millions, and be dismissed as an irrelevant social club with no meaning for the twentieth century. I am meeting young people every day whose disappointment with the church has risen to outright disgust.
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., “Letter from a Birmingham Jail