Tag Archives: Church

Husbands, Love Your Wives

Since it is Valentine’s Day week, we should take a second and review some instructions from Paul on how husbands are to love your wives.

Please add to this discussion in the comments and help your brothers out.


There is no “if your wife” qualification in these statements from Paul (quoted below).

Husbands, we are called to love our wives the same way Christ loved the church. That’s a big deal. Christ gave His life for the church. He didn’t just die on the cross for the church, He gave His life to and for the church.

What does that mean? It means that in life Christ nurtured the church through the Word and deeds with grace, truth and love. Even when He was rejected by His own (John 1).

If your wife doesn’t do her part, that is no reason not to do your part.

Men,

  • Love your wife even when you don’t feel loved
  • Love your wife when you are stressed at work
  • Love your wife when neither of you have time to clean the house
  • Love your wife when you get home from work and still need to mow the grass
  • Love your wife when Ramen noodles or Totino’s pizza is what’s for dinner
  • Love your wife when the finances are not in order

Love does not mean you always give in to her every request. It just means that you are kind and understanding and explain your reasoning when you sometimes don’t agree. And you do apologize or change your mind when she points out a flaw or an error in your reasoning. Even is she doesn’t reciprocate, you lead by example.

Your wife wants your attention when she speaks. Practice active communication techniques. Just as you do at work, show respect in your communications. I am not perfect on this either, so don’t think I’m pretending like I’ve achieved perfection on this. I fail at it.

Here is the main point, you lead by example. Be an example to your wife, to your sons and to your daughters. Show them what it means to be a husband living on Biblical principles.

Husbands, love your wives, just as Christ also loved the church and gave Himself up for her, So husbands ought also to love their own wives as their own bodies. He who loves his own wife loves himself; for no one ever hated his own flesh, but nourishes and cherishes it, just as Christ also does the church, because we are members of His body.
Ephesians 5:25‭, ‬28‭-‬30 NASB
https://bible.com/bible/100/eph.5.25-30.NASB

If I speak with the tongues of men and of angels, but do not have love, I have become a noisy gong or a clanging cymbal. If I have the gift of prophecy, and know all mysteries and all knowledge; and if I have all faith, so as to remove mountains, but do not have love, I am nothing. And if I give all my possessions to feed the poor, and if I surrender my body to be burned, but do not have love, it profits me nothing. Love is patient, love is kind and is not jealous; love does not brag and is not arrogant, does not act unbecomingly; it does not seek its own, is not provoked, does not take into account a wrong suffered, does not rejoice in unrighteousness, but rejoices with the truth; bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things.
1 Corinthians 13:1‭-‬7 NASB
https://bible.com/bible/100/1co.13.1-7.NASB

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Love & Respect: The Love She Most Desires, the Respect He Desperately Needs

The Net Was Not Torn

I started reading the book Sharing Jesus (Without Freaking Out) yesterday. The writer asks the reader to digest the book one chapter per week. The principle in the first chapter is that “God created you for His glory, to advance His gospel with the gifts, talents, and opportunities He gave you.” It is an eight week read that also includes a study guide for small groups.

I’m not sure if this was a coincidence or not, but today as I was reading John 21 as part of my Bible app reading plan, verse 11 struck a chord in my heart/spirit.

“Simon Peter went up and drew the net to land, full of large fish, a hundred and fifty-three; and although there were so many, the net was not torn.”
John 21:11 NASB

Now, sharing your faith will undoubtedly lead to you eventually asking someone to come to church with you. If you can get everyone in your small group to start sharing then that will lead to a catch of many fish. When you have a big catch you need to be prepared to handle the weight of it.

Now, John 21 is totally in contrast to Luke 5:6-7.

“When they had done this, they enclosed a great quantity of fish, and their nets began to break; so they signaled to their partners in the other boat for them to come and help them. And they came and filled both of the boats, so that they began to sink.”
Luke 5:6‭-‬7 NASB

Peter (Simon) and a few of the other apostles take part in both of these events. But what is different is the timing. John 21 is after Jesus’ resurrection and after Jesus had taught them and breathed on them the Holy Spirit (John 20:22).

In Luke 5, Jesus was calling the fisherman into service for the first time.

What does this mean, that their nets broke the first time but they did not break the second time? Well, It’s your guess and mine. However I think I have a good idea. It’s because they were now prepared and willing to be fishers of men. Now God was not only blessing them with fish to catch, but He had also blessed and strengthened the nets that caught them.

The heavy weight that comes with a large catch (a large number of newcomers to a church) can tear apart a local church if it hasn’t prepared with a leadership training pipeline with people ready to take on new roles and allowed God to guide the vision of the church through prayer. But when that church is ready and has proven that it can be faithful in preparing, seeking God’s will and acting in accordance, then the nets will not be torn.

At this point in the  story Jesus has Peter confirm three times if he is prepared to shepherd the church.

“So when they had finished breakfast, Jesus said to Simon Peter, “Simon, son of John, do you love Me more than these?” He said to Him, “Yes, Lord; You know that I love You.” He said to him, “Tend My lambs.” He said to him again a second time, “Simon, son of John, do you love Me?” He said to Him, “Yes, Lord; You know that I love You.” He said to him, “Shepherd My sheep.” He said to him the third time, “Simon, son of John, do you love Me?” Peter was grieved because He said to him the third time, “Do you love Me?” And he said to Him, “Lord, You know all things; You know that I love You.” Jesus said to him, “Tend My sheep.” John 21:15‭-‬17 NASB

 

Sharing Jesus (without freaking out)
Sharing Jesus (without freaking out): Evangelism the Way You Were Born to Do It

Martin Luther King, Jr., a message for the church today

In April of 1963, Martin Luther King, Jr. wrote an open letter to several clergymen who had written him in jail. The clergymen were not favorable of his “nonviolent direct action” in Birmingham to affect change concerning segregation in the city.

In his letter, Martin Luther King, Jr. took aim at several groups, but the complacent Christian church was a big target.

Although these words were written to the church of the 1960s, the words ring true as much today as they did then. I am a big believer in the cycles that take place in human history. Why? Because I know so many people who are ignorant of true history and we are doomed to repeat it.

As you read the excerpt below. You fill in the blank on what social injustice your church is not fighting to correct. You fill in the blank on what your church has conformed to in the face of fear. There is no need for me to call out all the possible options for you. I believe you will feel the conviction placed on you as you read this excerpt from “Letter from a Birmingham Jail”. 

Yes, I see the church as the body of Christ. But, oh! How we have blemished and scarred that body through social neglect and fear of being nonconformists.

There was a time when the Church was very powerful. It was during that period when the early Christians rejoiced when they were deemed worthy to suffer for what they believed. In those days the church was not merely a thermometer that recorded the ideas and principles of popular opinion; it was a thermostat that transformed the mores of society. Wherever the early Christians entered a town the power structure got disturbed and immediately sought to convict them for being “disturbers of the peace” and “outside agitators.” But they went on with the conviction that they were a “colony of heaven”, and had to obey God rather than man. They were small in number but big in commitment. They were too God-intoxicated to be “astronomically intimidated.” They brought an end to such ancient evils as infanticide and gladiatorial contest.


Things are different now. The contemporary church is so often a weak, ineffectual voice with an uncertain sound. It is so often the arch supporter: of the status quo. Far from being disturbed by the presence of the church, the power structure of the average community is consoled by the Church’s silent and often vocal sanction of things as they are. But the judgment of God is upon the church as never before. If the church of today does not recapture the sacrificial spirit of the early church, it will lose its authentic ring, forfeit the loyalty of millions, and be dismissed as an irrelevant social club with no meaning for the twentieth century. I am meeting young people every day whose disappointment with the church has risen to outright disgust.
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., “Letter from a Birmingham Jail