Tag Archives: worry

Just Breathe, In The Midst of Trouble

I don’t open up much on my blog about what things tend to stress me out. So is the problem of every man. The pride that keeps us from opening up, hiding behind a mask of confidence, is how we display strength. Well, let me just go ahead and confess and list out what’s up with me right now.

What is troubling me?

  • Work politics
  • Project Deadlines
  • Family Obligations
  • Work Deliverables
  • Home Additions
  • College savings
  • All that other dad stuff

You may have noticed that this is just a list of what stresses everybody out. These are all old foes and known adversaries. And experience I’ve gained from past battles will guide me through.

What keeps me going?

  • Prayer
  • Faith
  • Love
  • God’s Word
  • Friends
  • and now Exercise, seriously, run your stress away

It’s amazing how you can melt your stress away with a long run or a good weight training session. But it’s a temporary relief.

What really helps is the knowledge that God loves me and will never forsake me.


Even if I mess up everything on my list. I know I’ll achieve everything on His list and the purpose He has for me.

Though I walk in the midst of trouble, You will revive me;
You will stretch forth Your hand against the wrath of my enemies,
And Your right hand will save me.
The Lord will accomplish what concerns me; Your lovingkindness, O Lord, is everlasting; Do not forsake the works of Your hands.

Psalm 138:7-8

For David to write this Psalm, it could have been any number of issues that he faced in his life. But even if my issues are much smaller in comparison, You will revive me, O Lord, with Your lovingkindness.

I will be bold with strength in my soul.

On the day I called, You answered me; You made me bold with strength in my soul.

Psalm 138:3

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Dale Carnegie’s 5 Strategies For Conquering Fear and Anxiety

Original Article by Shana Lebowitz

Dale Carnegie is one of the most trusted authors in the self-improvement space. Thanks largely to his bestseller “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” originally published in 1936.

His 1948 book, “How to Stop Worrying and Start Living,” deals with tactics for liberating yourself from anxieties that make you less happy and less productive.

Below are Carnegie’s five most compelling strategies for reducing everyday anxieties.

1. Ask yourself, “What’s the worst that can happen?”

There’s a simple three-step technique that can help when you’re besieged by personal or professional worries.

First, ask yourself what’s the worst that could possibly happen. Second, prepare to accept the worst. Finally, figure out how to improve upon the worst, should it come to pass.

This technique is based on an anecdote from Willis Carrier, founder of the modern air-conditioning industry. While working for the Buffalo Forge Company as a young man, Carrier found that a new gas-cleaning service his company provided wasn’t as effective as he’d hoped.

Carrier realized that the worst that could happen was that his company would lose $20,000. He then accepted it: The company could qualify the loss as the cost of researching a new strategy. Finally, he figured out how to improve the situation: If the company bought $5,000 worth of new equipment, they could resolve the issue. Ultimately, that’s exactly what they did, and they ended up making $15,000.

2. Gather all the facts in an objective way.

As Herbert E. Hawkes, former dean of Columbia College, told Carnegie, “If a man will devote his time to securing facts in an impartial, objective way, his worries will usually evaporate in light of knowledge.”

Carnegie offers two ways to go about collecting facts objectively. You can pretend that you’re gathering this data for someone else, so you’re less emotionally invested in what you find.

Or you can pretend that you’re a lawyer who is preparing to argue the other side of the issue — so you gather all the facts against yourself. Write down the facts on both sides of the case and you’ll generally get a clearer picture of the truth.

3. Generate potential solutions to the problem.

Leon Shimkin, then general manager at Simon and Schuster (he later became the owner), figured out a way to cut the time he spent in meetings by 75%.

He told his associates that every time they wanted to present a problem at a meeting, they had to first submit a memorandum answering four questions: What is the problem? What is the cause of the problem? What are all possible solutions of the problem? What solution do you suggest?

According to Shimkin, once he instituted this new system, his associates rarely came to him with their concerns.

“They have discovered that in order to answer those four questions they have to get all the facts and think their problems through,” he told Carnegie. Once they did that, they typically found that “the proper solution has popped out like a piece of bread popping out from an electric toaster.”

In other words, action replaced worrying and talking.

4. Remember the law of averages.

The law of averages refers to the probability of a specific event occurring — and you should consult the law to find out if it’s worth fretting. Chances are good that whatever you’re worried about isn’t likely to transpire.

Carnegie writes that the US Navy employed the law of averages in order to boost sailors’ morale. Sailors who were assigned to high-octane tankers were initially worried that they would be blown up when the tank exploded. So the Navy provided them with exact figures: Of the 100 tanks that were hit by torpedoes, 60 stayed afloat and only five sank in less than 10 minutes, leaving time to get off the ship.

5. Place stop-loss orders on your worries.

This strategy is based on a principle in stock trading. One investor said he set a stop-loss order on every market commitment he made. Here’s how it works: Say you buy a stock that sells for 100 dollars a share and set a stop-loss order for 90 dollars a share. As soon as that stock dips to 90 dollars a share, you sell it — no questions asked.

You can use this principle in everyday life. For example, Carnegie once wanted to be a novelist, but after two years of toiling away without much success, he decided to cut his losses and go back to teaching and nonfiction writing.

Original Article Link by Shana Lebowitz


“Every day I pray. I yield myself to God, the tensions and anxieties go out of me and peace and power come in.” Dale Carnegie

“You can conquer almost any fear if you will only make up your mind to do so. For remember, fear doesn’t exist anywhere except in the mind.”
Dale Carnegie

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Worry and Stress

Worry and stress are like two evil serial killers. Either one of them will cause you great harm, but the way they do it is unique for each one. One may do it slowly while the other is quick. Yet make no mistake, both of these murderers will eventually kill you. You must recognize worry and stress inducing situations in your life and mitigate the subconscious and conscious reactions to them through reflection and prayer.

Many times you don’t even know the physical symptoms that you have are all related to a subconscious level of worry and stress. It took me a while to figure this out. I believe it manifests differently the older you get.

When I was in my early twenties many times the symptoms would manifest as mental tiredness and fatigue. Sometimes that would turn into low morale and a bad attitude toward work.

In my later twenties I started having symptoms that included my heart racing and dizziness. Of course I didn’t know what it was when it first started. This added even more worry because I thought I was having a heart attack each time it would happen. After having my heart checked by way of a physical stress test I found out that there was nothing wrong with my heart. And after I found that out, those symptoms went away. It’s as if once my mind found out my heart was fine that symptom of worry went away.

As I’ve gotten older the symptoms of worry and stress have changed into some odd and strange things. However I’ve learned to recognize when it’s happening.

Just know that the symptoms of stress and worry were manifesting as physical symptoms in my body. It does for everyone. The key is to identify that as the cause and work through the problem.

The thing is you won’t always know that you are “stressed”. Especially if you have become normalized to working through stressful situations. But when you add a touch of worry on top of those normally stressful situations, then you have to start recognizing the physical and mental manifestations of a “stressed out” season in your life. 

I’m starting to recognize the same issues in people I know. You may be able to recognize it too if you think about it a little. Do you work with a person who happens to get the flu every time a stressful situation or worrying issues pop up at the office? Its a subconscious reaction. The symptoms can differ, but the patterns will show if you think it through. 

Worry and stress can cause unexpected and unusual thoughts in your mind as well. These thoughts can even turn into physical actions when allowed to go too far without mitigation. As your circle of friends and even coworkers age, they will surely experience big life changes that can cause fairly rapid and quick onset stress and worry explosions. These events may not simply cause physically uncomfortable symptoms but can also cause very conscious and open reactions that can affect others. I’ve seen these things happen more often as I’ve gotten older. These actions include adultery, suicide, assault, protesting about nothing and other odd things.

The most common of these actions is probably arguing with a coworker or even a family member about absolutely nothing. Just really dumb things that don’t mean anything in the grand scheme of life. I know you’ve seen it. I saw two men in their forties acting like absolute children at work last week. I just sat in amazement  (slightly entertained) at these two grown men brought to sheer idiocy by a stressful moment with a touch of worry brought on by a prolonged periods of “restructuring” at my office. It happens.

The key is to recognize the symptoms by understanding the current work and life situations surrounding you and your acquaintances. Then mitigate by sharing the love of Christ and the promises that the Lord has given us through His Word. 

The examples of God bringing His people through some really stressful situations are abundant in the Bible. Read and share these examples and trust in the Lord to bring you through in His way. You won’t always know how or when. Yet God Is, and He has got you covered the way He has planned from the beginning.